Jacki Kellum

Juxtapositions: Read My Mind

Category: American Girl Doll Club

Meet Ivy – The Asian American Girl Doll – Celebrate Chinese New Year

Learn about Chinese New Year and Celebrate Diversity through the American Girl Doll Ivy Ling.

“Did you know? At Chinese New Year, families get together to celebrate. Red is the color for good luck in China. Houses are decorated in red paper cuttings symbolizing happiness, good fortune, and long life.

“Ivy’s family always has a big party to celebrate Chinese New Year. Ivy’s shimmering red silk dress is a special gift for the New Year celebrations.” American Girl Ultimate Visual Guide, p. 98.

Ivy and Julie were best friends, but Julie moved away, leaving Ivy feeling sad and alone.

“Ivy Ling wants her family to be proud of her and their Chinese heritage is very important to her. But when a big gymnastics tournament falls on the same day as her family reunion, Ivy has to learn how to balance her present with her past.” American Girl Ultimate Visual Guide, p. 99.

 

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Julie and Ivy lived in San Francisco during the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. That was the Hippie era, and the teens often altered their blue jeans, creating accessories. Ivy made a purse out of her jeans. The Hippies often sewed and painted rainbows and flowers on their clothes, too. They had Flower Power and loved Peace.

Ivy Ling was created in 1966, but she was retired a few years later. Now, she is a collector’s item. Julie is still sold at the American Girl Doll Stores.

©Jacki Kellum January 25, 2016

 

 

 

We Are All Earthlings – Lyrics and Music Video with Introduction by Jacki Kellum

Saturday is Chinese New Year’s, and I thought it might be nice to remember that all of us–animals and people–live on the same planet Earth.

©Jacki Kellum January 24, 2017

We Are All Earthlings Lyrics

Some of us have feathers
Some of us have fins
Some of us are furry
And some of us have skins
We swim and hop and slither
And leap and soar and run
And we all live together
On a planet of the sun

We are all earthlings
We are all earthlings
Spinning around together
On a planet of the sun

We live in the desert
We live inside a tree
We live high in the mountains
Or deep beneath the sea
We live in tents and cabins
In houses just for one
And we all live together
On a planet of the sun

We are all earthlings
We are all earthlings
Spinning around together
On a planet of the sun

Floating down a river
Swinging through the trees
Climbing up a mountain
Going with the breeze
All of us can have a happy healthy place to be
If we can float and swim and climb in earthling harmony

We are all earthlings
We are all earthlings
Spinning around together
On a planet of the sun

Spinning around together
On a planet of the sun

Songwriters
COMPTON, SARA J. / MOSS, JEFFREY A.

 

Short Video Illustrating the Timeline of the Historical American Girl Dolls & A Discussion of How American Girl Dolls Are Important Teaching Resources

©Jacki Kellum January 19. 2017

See More at jackikellum.com Here: http://jackikellum.com/american-girl-dolls-are-an-excellent-way-to-learn-american-history/

American Girl Dolls Are An Excellent Way to Learn American History

You may believe that the American Doll experience is limited to nothing more than the buying of expensive dolls, but that is not the case. From the very beginning, Pleasant T. Rowland launched the company as a way to teach the history of America to girls, and from the beginning, the dolls spanned several generations.

1764 – Kaya – Historically speaking, Kaya is the first American Girl Doll, and she represents the Nez Perce people who migrated down into America during the Ice Age. Although people often say that Native Americans were always here, the reality is that all of the people in the USA are immigrants. But Kaya’s people and other Native Americans got here first.

1774 – Felicity is the Revolutionary War Doll.

1812  – Caroline represents the era of America’s War of 1812.

1824 – Josefina represents the Mexican immigrants before New Mexico was a state.

1854 – Kirsten represents the Swedish immigrants and the Pioneers during the Westward movement. She lived in Minnesota.

1864 – Addy was a run-away slave during the Civil War.

1904 – Samantha represents the period when women began to be recognized as equal to men. She represents the turn-of-the-century Suffragist era.

1914 – Rebecca Rubin represents the Russian Jews who immigrated to New York City.

1934 – Kit was a tom-boy during the Great Depression. She was interested in writing.

The List goes on. We have Molly from the World War II era and  Maryellen from the 1950’s

Melody is from the 1960’s, and she represents the popularity of Motown Music and the Civil Rights Movement.

Julie represents the Hippie movement of the late Sixties and the early Seventies.

It would be easy to dismiss the American Girl Doll Company and accuse it of being too commercial and too expensive, but when we look more carefully at the teaching that the company fosters, we need to think again.

In my opinion, The American Girl Doll Company is one of the greatest teaching resources available, and I am thrilled to be in a position to share what I have learned about America through American Girl Dolls.

©Jacki Kellum January 19, 2017

 

Free Video How to Draw American Girl Doll Kaya’s Saddle Design

Another Video about Kaya and Her Appaloosa Horse

How to Draw American Girl Doll Kaya’s Saddle Design Step by Step

 

 

How to Draw A Native American Geometric Design Like the Decorative Part of American Girl Kaya’s Saddle

One of the best resources for learning about the American Girl Doll Kaya is the book Welcome to Kaya’s World. Unfortunately, that book is out of print, but a few copies are floating around. You can probably find a used copy of the book on Amazon. On the cover of that book, as well as on the cover of the book Kaya’s Hero, you see Kaya holding the saddle for her Appaloosa horse, Steps High.

In another video, All About Kaya’s Appaloosa Horse Steps High, I talked about how important horses were to Kaya’s people, and I said that Kaya was particularly close to her horse Steps High and to her horse’s foal Sparks Flying.

I explained that the Nez Perce people showed their pride in their horses in the way that they decorated them.

“Katie Harris is photographed with her Appaloosa. Harris made most of the horse trappings as well as her own traditional outfits herself, including the bead work. Some of the trappings are passed down from older generations but the girls like to make their own to continue the tradition.” – National Geographic

Many Native Americans create ornate decorations based on geometric designs.

Notice that Kaya’s saddle has two identical geometric designs on each side. I’ll show you how to draw one of those designs.

Step 1: With a pencil, draw a large circle, like the tan circle, but don’t color it yet.

Step 2: With a pencil, draw a slightly smaller circle, like the red circle, but don’t color it yet.

Step 3: With a pencil, draw a very light guide line from the top, middle of the circle to the bottom. If your circle were a clock, you would be drawing from 12:00 to 6:00.  This is not part of the design. It is simply a guide line to help you place the rest of the design. At the end, we’ll erase this line entirely.

Step 4: With a pencil, draw a very light guide line from the left, middle of the circle to the right. If your circle were a clock, you would be drawing from 9:00 to 3:00.  This is not part of the design. It is simply a guide line to help you place the rest of the design. At the end, we’ll erase this line entirely.

Step 5: With a pencil, draw a narrow triangle on the left side of the middle line. Do not color the triangle yet.

Step 6: With a pencil, draw a narrow triangle on the right side of the middle line. Do not color the triangle yet. These two triangles are symmetrical. They are the same but they are facing opposite directions. Sym from Symmetrical Means Same.

When I remove the support lines, you will see the the two triangles overlap. When you color them, they will seem to be one large shape.

Step 7: With a pencil, draw a small circle in the exact center of the design. Do not color the circle yet.

Step 8: With a pencil, draw a small triangle on the left side of the small circle. Do not color the triangle yet.

Step 9: With a pencil, draw 3 more small triangles on the other sides of the small circle. Do not color the triangles yet.

When I remove the support lines, you can see the design better.

Step 10: With a pencil, draw a rounded rectangle across the top right of the design. Do not color the rectangle yet.

Step 11: With a pencil, draw a small triangle inside the rounded rectangle. Do not color the triangle yet.

Step 12: With a pencil, draw 3 more small triangles inside the rounded rectangle. Do not color the triangles yet.

Step 13: Draw a moderately-sized circle in the center.

Step 14: Using the vertical guide line for placement, draw a circle on the center line, above the small circle.

Step 15: Draw another circle below the central circle.

 

Step 16: Draw 4 more circles.

This is how the design looks so far without the guide lines:

Step 18: Draw a triangle in the lower, center section of the design. Round the top of the triangle.

Step 19: Draw 2 more triangles on the lower part of the design.

Step 20: Color your design. Notice that the top is colored with a darker blue.

©Jacki Kellum January 6, 2017

A Short List of the Historical American Girl Dolls in Order – with Dates

1764 – Kaya – A Child of the Early American Nez Perce People

1774 – Felicity Merriman – A Child during the American Revolution

1812 – Caroline Abbott – A Child during the War of 1812

1824 – Josefina Montoya – A Child from New Mexico before it became a state

1853 – Cecile Rey – A Child of mixed race from Ante-Bellum New Orleans

1853 – Marie Grace Gardner – Another Child from Jacki Kellum-Bellum New Orleans]

1854 – Kirsten Larson – A Swedish Immigrant and Pioneer in Minnesota

1864 – Addy Walker – A Runaway Slave Child during the Civil War

1904 – Samantha Parkington – A Child during the Victorian-Edwardian period when women’s rights and suffrage were of concern

1914 – Rebecca Rubin – A Child of Jewish-Russian descent whose family immigrated to the Lower East Side of New York City

1934 – Kit Kittredge – A Child growing up during the Great Depression

1954 – Maryellen Barkin – A Child growing up in post World War II–during the 1950’s

1964 – Melody Ellison – An African American Child growing up during the Civil Rights Era in Motown Detroit

1974 – Julie Albright – A Child growing up in San Francisco during the Hippie Era

©Jacki Kellum December 25, 2016

 

 

Kaya’s People, the Nez Perce, Bred Magnificent Appaloosa Horses

Kaya’s Horse Steps High is a Type of Appaloosa Horse.

Kaya’s people, the Nez Perce became horse enthusiasts and horse breeders. Ultimately, they crossbred Appaloosa horses with a another, hearty horse, and even today, the Nez Perce people are characterized as Indians with spotted horses.

“According to tradition, the Nez Perce first saw horses while visiting their friends, the Cayuses, who had traded for them with their southern neighbors, the Shoshones. The Nez Perce valleys turned out to be ideal for raising horses, and the Nez Perce people soon became known for their swift horses and fine horsemanship.” Welcome to Kay’s World, p. 6.

The Nez Perce People Lived North of the Shoshone, but they were neighbors.

“The Appaloosa is an American horse breed best known for its colorful spotted coat pattern. There is a wide range of body types within the breed, stemming from the influence of multiple breeds of horses throughout its history. Each horse’s color pattern is genetically the result of various spotting patterns overlaid on top of one of several recognized base coat colors.” Wikipedia

“Artwork depicting prehistoric horses with leopard spotting exists in prehistoric cave paintings in Europe. Images of domesticated horses with leopard spotting patterns appeared in artwork from Ancient Greece and Han dynasty China through the early modern period;

the Nez Perce people of what today is the United States Pacific Northwest developed the original American breed.

“Appaloosas were once referred to by settlers as the ‘Palouse horse’, possibly after the Palouse River, which ran through the heart of Nez Perce country. Gradually, the name evolved into ‘Appaloosa’. – Wikipedia

“Katie Harris is photographed with her Appaloosa. Harris made most of the horse trappings as well as her own traditional outfits herself, including the bead work. Some of the trappings are passed down from older generations but the girls like to make their own to continue the tradition.” – National Geographic

Appaloosas have a freckled kind of spotting, but the spot patterns may vary. If the spots are large and solid, the horse is probably a Pinto or a Paint. Those are also Native American Horses, but they are not like Appaloosas.

Now the foal has grown and has a foal of her own.

Children’s Librarian Jacki Kellum has begun work toward launching an American Girl Doll Club.

The club will officially begin January 20, 2017, and there will be videos about how to sew, cook, and design clothes for all of the American Girl Dolls. There will also be free videos that teach the history and the character of each doll. Kaya is the first doll for the American Girl Doll.  Expect new American Girl material every day or two.american-girl-poster

©Jacki Kellum December 24.2016

Very Short Video – How Bear Helped Nimiipuu – A Nez Perce Legend for Kaya, the American Doll – Watch Free

“Long ago, when the people were first on the earth and animals could still talk, a little boy strayed too far from his village. For days, the boy wandered lost, without food or water.

Then one day, he came upon Hah-hahts, Grizzly Bear.“Now Hah-hahts had heard from his friend Coyote that Nimíipuu were coming to live on the land.  Hah-hahts had never seen Nimíipuu, but he was sure he hated them. He thought Nimíipuu wanted to take away the land he loved.

Hah-hahts reared up on his hind legs and bared his sharp teeth and claws. ‘Child of Nimíipuu!’ he growled. ‘Do you think you can take my land from me? I will tear you to pieces with one swipe of my paw!’

“The boy just stood gazing at Hah-hahts. Finally he said in a quiet voice, All you can do is kill me. I am not afraid of death. Death is a part of life.’

 

“Hah-hahts stopped in his tracks. ‘All other animals fear me, but you do not!” he said. ‘You are as brave and as wise as Coyote. You must deserve to live on this land.

Come with me. I will show you all you need to know about your new home.’

“Hah-hahts flipped the boy onto his back and carried him off into the high country. He showed the boy the streams where Salmon ran in the spring and the homes of Deer and Elk.

He climbed along the backbone of the mountains and showed the boy the lands where Buffalo lived.

Image result for huckleberry

“He pointed out huckleberry and serviceberry bushes and the meadows where camas bulbs grew.

Image result for camas root

“Finally, Hah-hahts took the boy back to his village. ‘Now you know all I know about this land,’ he said. ‘Go and tell your people that as long as Nimíipuu honor the land, it will be theirs to use.’” Welcome to Kaya’s World, p. 22

Children’s Librarian Jacki Kellum has begun work toward launching an American Girl Doll Club. Enjoy this 2 minute video that retells the Native American Legend How Bear Helped Nimíipuu– [the Nimïipuu are the Nez Perce, who are Kaya, the American Girl Doll’s tribe]. The story is read by Jacki Kellum.

The club will officially begin January 20, 2017, and there will be videos about how to sew, cook, and design clothes for all of the American Girl Dolls. There will also be free videos that teach the history and the character of each doll. Kaya is the first doll for the American Girl Doll. american-girl-poster

©Jacki Kellum December 24, 2017 – Merry Christmas!

© 2017 Jacki Kellum

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